August 08, 2018 Blog Misc Traveling with Pets

Making the Most of Your Pet’s Microchip

A veterinarian checks a microchip on a cat

Making the Most of Your Pet’s Microchip

The annual Check the Chip Day is Wednesday, August 15th. This pet health event reminds pet families to have the microchip in their pet checked by the staff in their veterinarian’s office to be sure it is working, as well as to update any information in the microchip database which links your pet’s microchip number to your contact information.
Microchip Basics
A microchip provides a permanent method of identifying your pet; it is not a GPS device. A microchip is about the size of a grain of rice. A veterinarian implants the chip under the skin over the shoulders. The microchip has no battery or moving parts, but emits a unique radiofrequency code and is designed to last for up to 20 years. Animal shelters and veterinary offices have microchip scanners to “read” the chip. Watch Nugget get his microchip scanned below. A microchip is typically a prerequisite for international pet travel.

And Also a Collar and Tag
A microchip is essential because many pets are not wearing a collar when they are separated from their family. But a collar with an ID tag displaying your phone number will get your pet home faster since anyone can read an ID tag, but only some have access to a microchip scanner. You might also consider putting your pet’s microchip number on their collar, but some folks choose to keep that information private.
The Power of a Chip
One of my patients escaped out the window when a workman inadvertently left the window open after doing repairs. Despite canvassing their neighborhood and following other suggestions for finding a lost pet, Sneezy was nowhere to be found. The little guy was MIA for two months until someone in the neighborhood noticed a scrawny, but very friendly cat they had not seen before. The kind neighbors scooped him up and delivered him to the local shelter. It took all of about ten minutes for the shelter staff to scan Sneezy, find his microchip and contact his jubilant family.
To make your lost pet story have a happy ending like Sneezy’s, be sure your pet’s microchip registration is up to date. If you only know the chip number, look up the company online. Also check the information on your pet’s ID tags and replace them if the information is out of date. If you want to keep your pet’s microchip information handy, download and print out this postcard from AMC’s Usdan Institute and keep it with his/her records.

Tags: amcny, animal medical center, animal shelter, animals, ann hohenhaus, check the chip, collar, lost pets, microchip, pet travel, pets, veterinary,

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