Should I Adopt an Older Dog?

Adopt a dog

October is Adopt a Dog Month or Adopt a Shelter Dog Month. Either way, I hope your family is thinking about whether or not adopting a dog is the right move. Keep in mind, adopting a dog at the wrong time or without considering its impact on your family is always a bad idea. Adopting a puppy, with her big eyes and fluffy coat, is easy until the little devil comes home. Adopting an adult dog, may circumvent some of the puppy-raising challenges puppy families face.

Advantages of a Grown-Up Dog
In my mind, adopting an adult dog bypasses one of the biggest challenges of having a puppy: housebreaking. Adult dog adopters shouldn’t expect perfection from the new arrival, but after a few days, most housebroken dogs will realize how they go “out.”

Teething is another puppy milestone avoided by adopting an adult dog. Last week, one of my teething puppy patients ate some shoe trees, a bottle of Zantac, and a box of tissues after letting himself into the bedroom. Other puppy patients have eaten woodwork, chair legs, and shoes. Once a dog hits about one year of age, their indiscriminate chewing tends to subside.

Last spring, one of my mature clients got a new puppy. Both of his aged dogs had died over the winter. The new puppy was delightful, except for the stubborn Giardia infection. In a moment of diarrhea-related frustration and puppy induced exhaustion, he asked me to find her a new family. Now that the diarrhea is cleared up and she is approaching her first birthday as a much calmer grown-up dog, there is no chance of him giving her up, but this vignette shows how trying puppies can be.

Points to Consider When You Adopt Any Dog
Puppies require a series of visits to the veterinarian for vaccinations and other preventive health care procedures. While these medical expenditures will not be necessary in an adult dog that is already well vaccinated and spayed or neutered, all pets need medical care. Your family needs to consider not only the cost of preventive care but how you will manage a catastrophic illness or injury. Other ongoing costs to include in budget planning are food, treats, grooming, boarding, and the inevitable wardrobe of seasonal collars, leashes, and bandanas you just can’t resist at your local pet emporium.

Adopting is Not for Everyone
Some families need the predictability of a purebred dog. Certain breeds are easier for people with allergies, making the decision to have a purebred dog a medical decision. Those of us living in apartment buildings face restrictions on dog size and breed. A cute puppy with an unknown family tree may result in a lovely pet that exceeds the size limit set by the building’s board of directors. Who needs that kind of heartbreak?

Did this blog post make your choice between a puppy and a dog easier or more difficult? Whatever your decision, consider adopting, not shopping.

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