Category Archives: Pet Safety

Cautionary Tales of Rabies Encounters in New York City

raccoon

World Rabies Day is September 28th. Canine rabies was a major topic for veterinarians in 2021 due to a canine travel ban issued by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) after they discovered rabies in dogs imported with fraudulent rabies certificates. The restrictions have been somewhat loosened, but they still require scrolling through several pages

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September is National Preparedness Month: How to Protect Your Pets

A veterinary professional kissing a dog

September is National Preparedness Month. New Yorkers have faced many challenges over the past two decades, starting with 9/11, followed by Hurricane Sandy and, more recently, the COVID-19 pandemic. People and pets have been affected by all three of these disasters. The 2022 theme for National Preparedness month is: “A Lasting Legacy.” This theme encourages

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High Rise Syndrome in Dogs and Cats

A cat leaning out of a window

Some diseases occur worldwide, as we’ve learned all too well from the COVID-19 pandemic. But many diseases occur in specific geographic locations or are restricted to certain populations of humans and animals. For example, Valley Fever or coccidioidomycosis, a fungal infection that can affect dogs and people, occurs predominantly in the southwestern United States due

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Less Than 5% of Pet Owners Know How to Handle Pet Food Safely. Do You?

A dog with a bowl of food

I started 2022 with my suggestions for choosing the right food for your pet. This week I want to follow up with some tips for safe handling of pet food and treats, based on the United States Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Guidelines. These guidelines are designed to protect pets and pet owners against infectious

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Rat Sightings Are Up in New York City: What Pet Owners Should Know

A dog with a rat in its mouth

It’s been all over the news in 2021: rat sightings are way up in New York City. While there’s plenty of speculation why, one thing is clear: increased interaction between rats and dogs is not good for the health of our fur families. Rats carry diseases that can be deadly to both dogs and humans,

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