Proteinuria in Pets

proteinuria

When your pet has an annual physical examination, your veterinarian will often request a urine sample. Once you collect the sample, your veterinarian will have the urine analyzed in the laboratory. Urinalysis is a test which assesses nearly 20 different parameters. This blog post will focus on one particular parameter of the urinalysis, protein.

Protein is Not Normal
In a normal dog or cat, very little protein passes through the kidneys and into the urine. When a routine urinalysis identifies an increase in urine protein, a number of tests are performed to determine the source of the protein. If the source is thought to be the kidneys, a follow-up test called a urine protein creatinine ratio is performed. This ratio helps us determine if the protein in the urine is elevated to a level where medical intervention is needed. Multiple assessments of a pet’s protein creatinine ratio may be necessary before a diagnosis of excessive protein in the urine is made. The condition where excessive protein is lost in the urine is called proteinuria.

Causes of Proteinuria
Chronic kidney disease is probably the most common cause of proteinuria, but veterinarians see it in pets with other chronic diseases as well. Diabetes, Lyme disease, and Cushing’s disease have all been associated with increased urine protein levels. But a bladder infection or fever might cause increased protein in the urine. The key to determining the cause of proteinuria is a complete diagnostic evaluation which will include blood tests, blood pressure measurement, and possibly even an ultrasound.

Protein is a Problem
Proteinuria is problematic on several levels. Protein in the urine signals a problem with the kidneys. The leakage of protein though the kidneys damages the kidneys and decreases their ability to remove waste products from the body, leading to kidney failure. Loss of protein in the urine can deplete the protein in the body, putting the patient at risk for swelling of the limbs and blood clots. High blood pressure has also been associated with protein loss in the urine. In both dogs and cats with chronic kidney disease, proteinuria correlates with an increased risk of death from chronic kidney disease when compared to patients without proteinuria.

Treating Proteinuria
Once a diagnosis of proteinuria has been established, any underlying disorders, such as Lyme disease, will be treated. Successful treatment can resolve the proteinuria. If the cause of the proteinuria is chronic kidney disease, then lifelong treatment will be required. Non-drug interventions include a kidney-friendly diet and anti-inflammatory supplements like fish oil. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors like enalapril or benazepril, and newer medications like telmisartan (an angiotensive receptor II blocker) are administered to decrease protein loss. If pets have high blood pressure, antihypertensive medications will be prescribed and blood pressure monitored. Some pets with serious protein loss need medications to prevent formation of blood clots.

Help Keep Your Pet Healthy
You are part of your pet’s healthcare team. Your efforts in collecting a urine sample helps veterinarians like me take better care of your pet. Better care means you and your pet can have more healthy and happy years together.

Giving Indoor Cats Outdoor Time

adopt a shelter cat monthJune is the ASPCA’s Adopt a Shelter Cat Month and I am hoping many cats will get a forever home during this month. In a prior blog, I made a case for making your cat an indoor animal for safety reasons. But to help all the new cat owners get ready for their new furry friend and to inspire current cat owners to enrich their cat’s lives, I have some suggestions on how to safely bring the great outdoors to your indoor cat.

Cat Harness and Leash
The simple method of giving your indoor cat outdoor time is a leash and harness. Notice, I did not say a collar because cats can slip out of a collar and also many harnesses. One snug, but comfortable looking harness is the Kitty Holster, made of cotton and with a top zipper closure, it appears very secure for a walk outdoors with your cat.

Cat Gazebo
Using the search words “cat gazebo” or “cat enclosure,” I found a number of outdoor play spaces that can easily and quickly be set up in your backyard or on your deck. I would choose a cat tent with a roof or canopy to provide shade on a sunny day. Because cats love to climb, I would also select one with a built in perch or two. Some cat gazebos are very elaborate and become an integral part of your outdoor living room.

cat connectorCat Connector
While nearly all of the products I identified to bring your indoor cat outdoors require you to transport your cat to the structure, I did find one system where your cat can have free access to her outdoor space. Using a connector kit that looks something like a dryer hose, the cat can exit the house via the tube installed into a window and end up in the outdoor cat condo, giving your cat total independence.

Cat Run
Another search term that identified some nice outdoor spaces for cats was “cat run.” Cat runs come in both vertical and horizontal versions which can be zipped together to form a large outdoor space for more than one cat at a time. The cat runs I found collapse into a small carrying case, making them portable for a traveling cat.

cat solariumCat Solarium
Fitting into a window like a window air conditioning unit, the cat solarium creates a cat sized bay window hovering over your yard. The windows on three sides give your cat a panoramic view of the great outdoors.

Bring Your Cat Closer to the Outdoors
If you don’t have a yard for a cat gazebo or your persnickety condo board won’t allow a solarium, consider bringing your cat closer to nature with a window hammock, a carpet covered window sill extender or a hanging window basket cat perch.

Whether you choose a solarium, a gazebo or just a window hammock, your cat will now be able to safely enjoy the great outdoors.