November 14, 2011 Everyday Medicine

Needleless Vaccinations

a dog receiving a nasal vaccination

Needleless Vaccinations

Vaccinations have been long associated with needles, but needleless vaccinations are gaining in popularity since they may be less painful and cannot spread disease if an unscrupulous medical professional reuses needles and syringes. Needleless vaccination increases safety for the medical professional administering a vaccine since there is no risk of a needlestick injury.

Intranasal Vaccines

Many parents are familiar with intransal vaccines through the pediatrician’s office. Pet owners may have also experienced intranasal vaccination for their dog against kennel cough (boradetella) or the intranasal vaccine against feline rhinothracheitis, calicivirus and panleukopenia. Now there is a second type of needleless vaccination, a vaccine injected into or under the skin without a needle. Merial produces a feline leukemia vaccine administered using a needleless syringe. The system consists of an injector, which uses a spring system or compressed carbon dioxide to “blast” the vaccine through the skin.

A needleless delivery system is also used for the canine melanoma vaccine. Watch a video of one of my dog patients receiving a melanoma vaccine.

You might be getting a needleless flu vaccine this year using the same technology we use for needleless feline leukemia and canine melanoma vaccines. The manufacturer of our devices announced needleless flu vaccines will be given in the 2011 flu season at Publix Markets and Fred Meyer stores.

How about that? Human medicine seems to be catching up to veterinary medicine this time!

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This may also be found in the “Tales from the Pet Clinic” blog on WebMD.com.

For over a century, The Animal Medical Center has been a national leader in animal health care, known for its expertise, innovation and success in providing routine, specialty and emergency medical care for companion animals. Thanks in part to the enduring generosity of donors, The AMC is also known for its outstanding teaching, research and compassionate community funds. Please help us to continue these efforts. Send your contribution to: The Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd Street, New York, NY 10065. For more information, visit www.amcny.org. To make an appointment, please call 212.838.7053.

Tags: anima medical center, cat, dogs, kennel cough, melanoma vaccine, nasal vaccine, pet health, pets, rhinotracheitis, vaccine, veterinarian, WebMD,

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