All posts by AMCteam

I Think My Cat Has a Cavity in Her Tooth

Concerned cat

The arrival of February means it is again Pet Dental Health Month. Since teeth are an important organ in the body, the Schwarzman Animal Medical Center provides pet families with many resources on pet dental health including: a pet health library entry describing when your puppy or kitten will lose their baby teeth, a recent

Read More...

Simple, Yet Essential: Stomach Tubes in Dogs and Cats

NG tube appears on an x-ray

Veterinarians at the Schwarzman Animal Medical Center have many pieces of medical equipment available to provide excellent care for your pets. Some equipment is high tech like our CT scanner, MRI and brand new linear accelerator. Other pieces of equipment are decidedly low tech. Today’s blogpost focuses on the low tech, yet essential stomach tube. Stomach

Read More...

What Vaccines Does My Dog Really Need?

William, a puppy

The Schwarzman Animal Medical Center has been an accredited member of the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) since 1976. The AAHA’s mission is to “simplify the journey towards excellence for veterinary practices.” One method of doing so is by developing evidence-based guidelines to help veterinarians practice high quality medicine. AAHA recently convened a task force to update its

Read More...

My Dog Ate My Ethernet Cable! And Other Examples of “Wired” Dogs

Wirehaired Fox Terrier

As dog lovers, we all have a special place in our hearts for wirehaired breeds including the wirehaired fox terrier, the breed with the most wins at New York City’s favorite dog show, the Westminster Kennel Club show. There are also wirehaired pointers, dachshunds and a relatedly obscure breed, the wirehaired pointing griffon. However, at

Read More...

Understanding the FDA Update on Non-Hereditary Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) in Dogs

Listening to a dog's heart

In July 2018, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began investigating reports of canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in dogs eating certain pet foods, many labeled as “grain-free” and containing a high proportion of peas, lentils, other legume seeds (pulses), and/or potatoes in various forms. While the FDA and veterinary scientists have yet to

Read More...